The “Watchmaker Argument”

watchmakerby Christine Farenhorst

Two hundred years ago a bishop, by the name of William Paley, wrote a book in which he used a watch to illustrate how clear it was that God is real. He pointed out how many intricate parts a watch had; and how only a skilled watchmaker could put these parts together. He described how the watch was designed so that each small part had a purpose. He then argued that the watch, because it had so many parts, had to have a planner and that, because the watch had a purpose – to tell time – it had to be an intelligent planner.

And then Bishop Paley also pointed out that there were many creatures much more complex and wonderful than the watch.

CONSIDER THE WOODPECKER

One of these creatures is the woodpecker — a bright, feathered hammerhead, whom we often nickname Woody. And if we look at the complex, awesome parts of the woodpecker, we cannot help but stand in awe of our Creator.

1. Shock-absorbing beak

The woodpecker, is a marvelous bird and far from ordinary. Take his bill, for example. Isn’t it amazing how he can ram it into a tree thousands of times a minute without having to replace it or getting a terrific headache? Well, his head is equipped with shock absorbers. And these shock absorbers cushion the blows so that the skull and brain of the woodpecker do not suffer.

2. Feet that grip

Now consider his feet. Have you ever wondered how this bird could stand sideways against the tree for such a long time without slipping off? Well, God equipped the woodpecker with very stiff tail feathers with which he can brace himself. Also, his feet have four claw-like toes. Two toes point up and two point down — so that he can get a good grip on bark.

3. Glue the grips

Now, once he’s drilled his little hole, how does he manage to reach inside the tree for his supper? Again, our God and his Creator has equipped him well. The woodpecker has a wonderful tongue. It’s long, with special glands on it which secrete a substance that bugs stick to like glue. When the woodpecker pulls his tongue out of the drilled hole it’s covered with a smorgasbord of insects.

4. Tongue that curls

The woodpecker’s tongue is worth even closer scrutiny. Most birds have tongues that are fastened to the back of their beak. The woodpecker would choke if this was the case because his tongue is far too long. So do you know where God fastened it? In his right nostril. Yes, when the woodpecker is not using his tongue, he rolls it up and stores it in his nose. Coming from the right nostril, the tongue divides into two halves. Each half passes over each side of the skull, (under the skin), comes around and up underneath the beak and enters the beak through a hole. And at this point the two halves combine and come out of his mouth. You have to agree that the woodpecker’s tongue is a most intricate and complicated piece of equipment.

BLIND TO THE WONDER

Not everyone believes that God created “every winged bird according to its kind.” (Genesis 1:21b) Some evolutionists believe that birds were first reptiles. A 1980 Science Yearbook states that

“paleontologists assume that the bird’s ancestors learned to climb trees to escape from predators and to seek insect food. Once the ‘bird’ was in a tree, feathers and wings evolved (grew) to aid in guiding from branch to branch.”

Isn’t it funny to think of so-called scientific men who believe this? If evolution were really true, why don’t we see lizards sitting in trees today sprouting little feathers? Doesn’t the thought alone make you chuckle? Actually, some evolutionists themselves are even aware that this is not really true. In 1985 an evolutionist named Feduccia said, “Feathers are features unique to birds, and there are no known intermediate structures between reptilian scales and feather.”

So why do people continue to believe and teach evolution? Romans 1:18-20 tells us why. Some people choose to suppress the truth. They have no faith in God’s marvelous creation, even though it is all around them, and these people are “without excuse” (v. 20) before God.

No, we are wise to stick to our faith in Scripture. The complexity of birds, certainly including the woodpecker, point to an intelligent Creator. And Bishop Paley’s argument is good because today, 200 years later, we can point to many other living creatures also, (even tiny microscopic forms of life are infinitely complex), who could never have come about by any chance process of evolution. We praise and thank God for His marvelous creation. With the four and twenty elders of Revelations 4:11 we can say:

“You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for You created all things, and by Your will they were created and have their being.”

Christine Farenhorst is the author of many books, including her new historical fiction novel, Katharina, Katharina, about the times of Martin Luther. This article first appeared in the February 1991 issue of Reformed Perspective.

 

My Father the Artist

It must have been 1979.  I was six years old and living in Whitehorse, in the Yukon Territory.  My mom and dad took my sister and me to the nearby Takhini Hot Springs.  After an afternoon’s swim we were in the cafeteria waiting for an order of French fries.  Dad grabbed a tray liner, flipped it over, and began doodling.  He showed me how you could quickly draw a little beach scene with sea gulls wheeling around.  His sea gulls were merely glorified versions of the letter “M,” but to a little kid this was enough to impress me with my father’s artistic ability.

As the years went on, I soon came to realize that my father wasn’t exactly Robert Bateman.  Dad has many other great abilities, but art doesn’t rank.  I’ve inherited his artistic talents, although I certainly do appreciate beautiful art.

I have the opportunity to do that almost every day.  One of the best things of living here in Australia is the freedom to walk year round.  Even in the winter, there’s no snow or ice with which to contend.  I enjoy a daily walk year round and, as I do so, I encounter artistry every single time.

As I walk along one of Launceston’s main thoroughfares, I see these beautiful flowers.  They’re present all year long — even in the Tasmanian winter.  These flowers come in two different varieties:  white and pink/mauve.

 

It turns out that these plants aren’t native to Tasmania.  They’re called Osteospermum and they originate from South Africa.  Though I don’t recall ever seeing them, I’m told that they can grow in Canada as well.

The thing that gets me when I see these flowers is not only the fact that they’re blooming in winter, but also the symmetry and the stunning combination of colours.  There is beauty with Osteospermum — there is artistry!  Every time I see these flowers, year round (!), I’m faced with the fact that my Father is an amazing artist.

In this world, there are exhibits of symmetry and beauty that defy explanation from a Darwinist perspective.  In Darwinism, every feature of the natural world requires an explanation related to natural selection.  There must be a clear advantage for a given plant or animal to be one way versus others.  But in reality there are many features that are just beautiful and have no clear natural selection advantage.  What evolutionary advantage accrues from combining white, blue and purple in the Osteospermum flower?  None.  It’s just simply beautiful.  It’s simply artistry.  It testifies to the fact that my Father has an eye for beauty.

If you’d like to see more examples of this, check out this 20 minute video:

My earthly father may not be much of an artist, but my heavenly Father leaves me in awe every day!

 

The Secrets of Insect Flight

Screen Shot 2017-05-05 at 11.48.45 AM.pngBusy bees. Dazzling dragonflies. Meddlesome mosquitoes. They all have the most amazing flying abilities. How do they do it? We are happy to offer a new article about God’s marvellous creation which explains some of the secrets of insect flight, supplied to us by Mr. Martin Tampier.

Martin is a professional engineer and energy consultant in Laval, Quebec. He is also a hobby photographer fascinated by insects, as the amazing close-ups of flying insects in the article demonstrate. He has already published elsewhere on God’s amazing creation. We thank him kindly for this article and trust that readers will praise God as they learn more about how insects fly.

Martin concludes,

Research around insect flight is on-going and many mysteries still need to be solved. However, some of the complicated features of insect wings are already being copied for man-made technology, including the development of micro-aerial vehicles—ironically modelled after the ‘primitive’ flying of dragonflies.

So while they may not recognize insects as divinely designed, researchers are confirming that they are incredibly complex and use extremely sophisticated physical mechanisms. To date, even the most amazing modelling software is insufficient to properly show how they achieve all of their amazing feats.

Screen Shot 2017-05-05 at 12.48.09 PM.png

To read the entire article and enjoy the exquisite photographs, click here.